Schematics and Slopers

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I'm Carly. Topics on this blog include (but are not limited to)
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twitter.com/antibromide:

    sexmusic:

    make it easy // we are scientists

    download: amazon | itunes

    — 2 weeks ago with 238 notes
    
there’s something charming, sometimes, about a bed that sits on the floor. i don’t know why, and i certainly don’t think that it’s inherently telling. but it often gives the impression that maybe a person doesn’t have their shit completely together. i like that. 

    there’s something charming, sometimes, about a bed that sits on the floor. i don’t know why, and i certainly don’t think that it’s inherently telling. but it often gives the impression that maybe a person doesn’t have their shit completely together. i like that. 

    (Source: rubyandmoon, via swedesinstockholm)

    — 2 weeks ago with 239616 notes
    newyorker:

A cartoon by Frank Cotham. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/NKioue

    newyorker:

    A cartoon by Frank Cotham. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/NKioue

    (Source: newyorker.com)

    — 2 weeks ago with 303 notes

    conflictingheart:

    Rear Window
    By Jordi Huisman

    The view from the rear of a residential building in an old city exhibits the ways in which people influence their surroundings. When a new building block is designed and built as a single structure and concept it acquires a uniformity and alignment; in older cities a much more fragmented and spontaneous architecture emerges. This architectural informality is in direct contrast with the façade of a building, which is much more aware of its appearance.

    The Rear Window series focuses on the rear of buildings in European capitals. While one balcony becomes home to a large satellite dish, the neighbouring balcony becomes storage space; a small tree once planted in the courtyard has grown into a massive obstacle. There is also an element of the voyeuristic: meticulous exposures resolve small details in the houses and lives of their residents which were never meant to be outwardly visible.

    By photographing these scenes in different capitals, national differences and global chaos are captured.

    (Source: thevelvetcell.com)

    — 3 weeks ago with 1616 notes

    70sscifiart:

    In the 1970′s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.”

    From The Public Domain Review, via Boing Boing

    (via shaolinurbanite)

    — 3 weeks ago with 6687 notes

    werewolfmonarch:

    remember the website where they didnt properly format the html so the text just kept getting bigger

    http://www.sewingandembroiderywarehouse.com/embtrb.htm

    (Source: kidouyuuto, via ibecameawerewolf)

    — 3 weeks ago with 68254 notes
    "I enjoy talking to you. Your mind appeals to me."
    George Orwell, 1984  (via nyu-tah)

    (Source: larmoyante, via iwantmybearsuit)

    — 3 weeks ago with 74696 notes
    calumet412:

At the Playboy Club, 116 E Walton, 1964, Chicago.

    calumet412:

    At the Playboy Club, 116 E Walton, 1964, Chicago.

    — 1 month ago with 105 notes